Our Cheese & Beverage Pairing Guide.

Finding your per­fect match in life isn’t always fun, but finding the per­fect food and drink match is fun all the time! Our pairing tips hope­fully will help you enjoy your fro­mage even more. There are no rules set it stone when it comes to pairing, so sit back, relax and let your palate have some fun!

white wine

Chardonnay

This wine is all over the place! Flavor pro­file varies depending on where and how it is made.

Old World Chardonnay: crisp and min­er­ally with fla­vors of apples and pears.
Pair with: fresh or bloomy rind cheeses, like Saint Angel

New World Chardonnay: rich, but­tery and oaky!
Pair with: slightly stronger cheese like Goot Essa Farm Mt Valley Sharp Cheddar

Pinot Grigio

Lighter and crisper; tends to be refreshing and fruity, with aromas of stone fruit, peach and lemon.

Pair with: Creamy goat or mixed milk cheese. La Tur or Cremont are a great match with the tart fla­vors of the wine.

Riesling

The super food-friendly wine can be super sweet or quite dry. You can usu­ally find some acidity, min­er­ality and aromas of trop­ical fruit.

Dry: Tropical fruit on the nose, but beau­ti­fully bal­anced flavor.
Pair with: A fresh chevre or a piece of some­thing stinky, like Irish Adrahan.

Sweet: This ver­sion can almost be like a sweet, syrupy wine with dom­i­nant aromas of peaches and trop­ical fruit.
Pair with: You’ll def­i­nitely need to con­trast the sweet­ness on this one with some­thing salty or funky.

Sauvignon Blanc

Very bright and lemony with clean citrus fla­vors.

Pair with: Perfect for soft and creamy goat milk cheese or triple crèmes, like Rochetta or Coupole.

Sparkling Wines

We love bub­bles and so does cheese! Flavors range from very dry, crisp to deep and sweet.

Dry: Toasty and fuller bodied with a deep nut­ti­ness.
Pair with: Triple crèmes would be perfect!

Sweet: Flavors of apple, pear and even straw­berry are the high­lights here.
Pair with: Triple crèmes would work very well, like Chaource, or La Tur.

red wines

Cabernet Sauvignon

Full-bodied with no shortage of flavor!

Old World Cabernet: Earthy with aromas of leather and dark dried fruits.
Pair with: Look for a cheese that will hold up to this big wine. Comte or Gruyere would work well.

New World Cabernet: Bold oaky fla­vors and incred­ibly jammy.
Pair with: Cabot Clothbound Cheddar or Parmigiano Reggiano.

Pinot Noir

Lighter bodied and delicate.

Old World Pinot: A little more funk—fresh berries but with a smat­tering of barn­yard funk in there!
Pair with: Langres, Chaource, St Marcellin…almost anything!

New World Pinot: More sugary with oak and spice.
Pair with: Manchego, ched­dars and any­thing with full and fatty flavors.

Malbec

The rustic wine is full-bodied with plenty of tan­nins, plums and berries.
Pair with: Gouda!

Merlot

A smooth and medium-bodied wine with a more rounded flavor than other reds.
Pair with: Mellow Cowgirl Creamery Wagon Wheel or tangy Bucheron.

Chianti

Dry, medium-bodied with a dis­tinct herbal quality with a hint of cherry.
Pair with: Pecorino!

Wheat Beers

Pair with: Bright and tangy goat’s milk or some­thing more but­tery and bloomy like Moses Sleeper.

Lagers

Typically approach­able and mellow with a del­i­cate bal­ance of toasti­ness and sweet­ness with a mild hop bit­ter­ness.

Pair with: Brie de Meaux or Taleggio

Belgian Style Ales

Aromatic yeasts, good bub­bles and a com­plex sweet­ness.

Pair with: Great cheese for beer, but great with Gruyere.

Hoppy Beers

Hops lend a bitter yin to the bal­ance the malt’s sugary yang.

Pair with: You’ll need a fuller-bodied cheese here—try cheddar or gouda.

Porters and Stouts

Great toasty fla­vors of choco­late and coffee. Beware: not all porters and stouts are dark and strong!

Pair with: A mellow blue like Cashel Blue.

SOME BASICS:

Make it a fair fight: make sure the strength of both pairing ele­ments is well matched. A heavy red against a del­i­cate goat cheese? C’mon…that just ain’t right!

Finding har­mony: try focusing on a flavor or quality you would like to high­light, such as earthy or cit­rusy, and match like with like. You might be sur­prised by what you discover!

Opposites attract: when you have a funky or earthy flavor some­times you want to com­ple­ment that with some­thing that will smooth it over. One of our favorite con­trast pair­ings is sweet and salty!

What grows together goes together: matching beer or wine with cheese pro­duced in the same region isn’t a guar­an­teed slam dunk, but it’s a great place to start.

Relax: Like we said, there are no real rules when it comes to pairing. Just have some fun, exper­i­ment and taste for yourself!